Cute Tumblr Themes
Naked Sushi. Information on the author will be provided on a need to know basis.
cognitivedissonance:

Submitted by: Shane Moore
Okay, I’m sick of people acting like these occupy people are a bunch of heroes. They’re a bunch of lazyass pretend hippies who don’t wanna work.
Can’t get a job? Fine, start mowing lawns, walking dogs, etc. Do SOMETHING other than trying to mooch off my hard earned money. I don’t get health insurance at my job. I don’t expect someone to just hand it to me like they’re greatful I work for them. I should be greatful to THEM for a job. There are jobs. You know how to get money from the rich? WORK FOR THEM. 
Go to Georgia. There’s a whole bunch of rotting crops since they got the illegals to leave. Now there’s jobs for AMERICANS who won’t take them up on it because they think they’re too good for farm work. http://forums.hannity.com/showthread.php?t=2270871
I am supposed to feel sorry for people who won’t work, made bad decisions by buying too much house, getting a worthless degree etc.? Sorry, keep your socialism and your change and I’ll keep my money. If you want to live in a socialist country, go try North Korea on for size. 
Meg, of Cognitive Dissonance:
Wow, that’s cute and callous. You assume there’s some mythical land with jobs aplenty for the taking. All you have to do is apply. Uh-huh.


Actually, I’m going to do you a favor and not post your email address. I’m just going to factcheck this a little.
First off, here’s the official list of demands from the Occupy Wall Street General Assembly. I see nothing in there about being able to not work ever again while “mooching” money off of Shane Moore or anyone else. 
Also, there are about four people actively seeking work to every job that’s available. Some estimate it’s higher than that. Employers are finding difficulty with hiring candidates with the qualifications they’re seeking. As the Business Insider article details in the above link, there’s a gap between finding skilled workers and those looking for work:

Employers say they’re having trouble finding applicants who fit the requirements for open positions. In a recent survey by the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation, 40 percent of the members of the Inc. 500 (a group of the fastest-growing companies in the United States) reported that the biggest impediment to growing their companies was “finding qualified people.”
“That clearly speaks to the skills gap that exists,” says Thom Ruhe, director of entrepreneurship for the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation. “So we’ve got this paradigm of millions that are unemployed, yet there are literally hundreds of thousands of jobs that are available if we had the right skilled labor to put there, so there’s a challenge.”

Note he says “millions unemployed” but “hundreds of thousands of jobs” are available. So even if finding skilled workers wasn’t an issue, there would not be enough jobs to go around.
This leads to underemployment - essentially, people who want to work full time, but cannot find full time work. As Bloomberg explains: “More Americans who would like a full-time job are settling for part-time work instead. They are counted in the underemployment rate, which increased to 16.5 percent, the highest this year, from 16.2 percent. The number of people working part-time for ‘economic reasons’ jumped 444,000 to 9.3 million.”
How do we get skilled workers? Affordable education is crucial. Right now, the class of 2011 will be the most indebted class to graduate college. Wages have not kept up with the cost of education, health care, housing, etc. This is all while corporations are posting record profits. We’re in trouble all around.
It’s not as simple as you think. You can’t just say “GET A JOB ASSHOLE” and that makes it so. Not with the way the economy is now. 

The average worker is unemployed for approximately 40 weeks. That’s nearly a year. 
As for Georgia, if the crops are already rotting, there’s nothing that can be done. And the law did not just get rid of undocumented workers, jackass. People who are in the country legally also left. You know why? If you live in fear of being hassled or arrested for not having proper documentation on you at ALL times, you might take off too.
And North Korea is not socialist. The -isms aren’t all the same thing. North Korea is, on a good day, a one-man dictatorship ruling a communist state. On a bad day, it’s a murderous, infantile tyrant’s playground. You want socialism? Try Sweden. It sounds horrific:

Sweden has an extensive child-care system that guarantees a place for all young children ages two through six in a public day-care facility. From ages seven to 16, children participate in compulsory education. After completing the ninth grade, 90% attend upper secondary school for either academic or technical education.  Swedes benefit from an extensive social welfare system, which provides childcare and maternity and paternity leave, a ceiling on health care costs, old-age pensions, and sick leave, among other benefits. Parents are entitled to a total of 480 days’ paid leave at 80% of a government-determined salary cap between birth and the child’s eighth birthday. The parents may split those days however they wish, but 60 of the days are reserved specifically for the father. 

As for the rest of your post, there’s really no point in addressing it. You sound as if you think we should grovel in gratitude for jobs that pay less than a living wage. Instead of wishing we were all at your level and had no benefits, why not wish for health care for all? Countries with socialized medicine spend far less of a proportional amount of GDP on health care than we do. One theory is better access to a doctor leads to more preventive care, which then stops minor issues from becoming major ones. 
Like it or not, you are in the 99%. It’s not lazy socialists like you picture. It’s this man. And this woman. And those of us in Casper, Wyoming. I will continue to fight for you to have the right to a decent living wage, a job with benefits, affordable education and health care, and congressmen who represent We the People and not corporations. You can continue ranting on the Hannity forums. We’ll be out there so you don’t have to, Shane.
Cheers,
Meg

I miss the days when all I had to worry about were these people

cognitivedissonance:

Submitted by: Shane Moore

Okay, I’m sick of people acting like these occupy people are a bunch of heroes. They’re a bunch of lazyass pretend hippies who don’t wanna work.

Can’t get a job? Fine, start mowing lawns, walking dogs, etc. Do SOMETHING other than trying to mooch off my hard earned money. I don’t get health insurance at my job. I don’t expect someone to just hand it to me like they’re greatful I work for them. I should be greatful to THEM for a job. There are jobs. You know how to get money from the rich? WORK FOR THEM. 

Go to Georgia. There’s a whole bunch of rotting crops since they got the illegals to leave. Now there’s jobs for AMERICANS who won’t take them up on it because they think they’re too good for farm work. http://forums.hannity.com/showthread.php?t=2270871

I am supposed to feel sorry for people who won’t work, made bad decisions by buying too much house, getting a worthless degree etc.? Sorry, keep your socialism and your change and I’ll keep my money. If you want to live in a socialist country, go try North Korea on for size. 

Meg, of Cognitive Dissonance:

Wow, that’s cute and callous. You assume there’s some mythical land with jobs aplenty for the taking. All you have to do is apply. Uh-huh.

Actually, I’m going to do you a favor and not post your email address. I’m just going to factcheck this a little.

First off, here’s the official list of demands from the Occupy Wall Street General Assembly. I see nothing in there about being able to not work ever again while “mooching” money off of Shane Moore or anyone else. 

Also, there are about four people actively seeking work to every job that’s available. Some estimate it’s higher than that. Employers are finding difficulty with hiring candidates with the qualifications they’re seeking. As the Business Insider article details in the above link, there’s a gap between finding skilled workers and those looking for work:

Employers say they’re having trouble finding applicants who fit the requirements for open positions. In a recent survey by the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation, 40 percent of the members of the Inc. 500 (a group of the fastest-growing companies in the United States) reported that the biggest impediment to growing their companies was “finding qualified people.”

“That clearly speaks to the skills gap that exists,” says Thom Ruhe, director of entrepreneurship for the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation. “So we’ve got this paradigm of millions that are unemployed, yet there are literally hundreds of thousands of jobs that are available if we had the right skilled labor to put there, so there’s a challenge.”

Note he says “millions unemployed” but “hundreds of thousands of jobs” are available. So even if finding skilled workers wasn’t an issue, there would not be enough jobs to go around.

This leads to underemployment - essentially, people who want to work full time, but cannot find full time work. As Bloomberg explains: “More Americans who would like a full-time job are settling for part-time work instead. They are counted in the underemployment rate, which increased to 16.5 percent, the highest this year, from 16.2 percent. The number of people working part-time for ‘economic reasons’ jumped 444,000 to 9.3 million.”

How do we get skilled workers? Affordable education is crucial. Right now, the class of 2011 will be the most indebted class to graduate college. Wages have not kept up with the cost of education, health care, housing, etc. This is all while corporations are posting record profits. We’re in trouble all around.

It’s not as simple as you think. You can’t just say “GET A JOB ASSHOLE” and that makes it so. Not with the way the economy is now. 

The average worker is unemployed for approximately 40 weeks. That’s nearly a year. 

As for Georgia, if the crops are already rotting, there’s nothing that can be done. And the law did not just get rid of undocumented workers, jackass. People who are in the country legally also left. You know why? If you live in fear of being hassled or arrested for not having proper documentation on you at ALL times, you might take off too.

And North Korea is not socialist. The -isms aren’t all the same thing. North Korea is, on a good day, a one-man dictatorship ruling a communist state. On a bad day, it’s a murderous, infantile tyrant’s playground. You want socialism? Try Sweden. It sounds horrific:

Sweden has an extensive child-care system that guarantees a place for all young children ages two through six in a public day-care facility. From ages seven to 16, children participate in compulsory education. After completing the ninth grade, 90% attend upper secondary school for either academic or technical education. Swedes benefit from an extensive social welfare system, which provides childcare and maternity and paternity leave, a ceiling on health care costs, old-age pensions, and sick leave, among other benefits. Parents are entitled to a total of 480 days’ paid leave at 80% of a government-determined salary cap between birth and the child’s eighth birthday. The parents may split those days however they wish, but 60 of the days are reserved specifically for the father. 

As for the rest of your post, there’s really no point in addressing it. You sound as if you think we should grovel in gratitude for jobs that pay less than a living wage. Instead of wishing we were all at your level and had no benefits, why not wish for health care for all? Countries with socialized medicine spend far less of a proportional amount of GDP on health care than we do. One theory is better access to a doctor leads to more preventive care, which then stops minor issues from becoming major ones. 

Like it or not, you are in the 99%. It’s not lazy socialists like you picture. It’s this man. And this woman. And those of us in Casper, Wyoming. I will continue to fight for you to have the right to a decent living wage, a job with benefits, affordable education and health care, and congressmen who represent We the People and not corporations. You can continue ranting on the Hannity forums. We’ll be out there so you don’t have to, Shane.

Cheers,

Meg

I miss the days when all I had to worry about were these people


notyourkinddear:

itsyourhomegirl:

being the “99%” in my gap hoodie. loljknot.
i saw a homeless woman walking around with no shoes in Center City. i changed my shoes 3x today. but clearly we’re the same class, cause we’re both the “99%.” or at least that’s what i’ve been told…or what people want me to say and believe.
let’s be real here; the whole 99/1 index is used as a marketing technique to be all inclusive and single out the “enemy,” the “corporations.”
what about the people that have multimillion dollar homes, multiple vacation homes, multiple vehicles, multiple degrees, multiple assets, but still don’t control corporations?  in other words: what about the petite bourgeois ? are they not the “enemy” as well? do they not support, enable, and encourage an unfair American capitalistic society that so many people suddenly want to address?
furthermore, the cries (for lack of a better word at 2 am) of the “99%” are NOT, i repeat, are NOT, any different (or more serious)  than issues that have been plaguing communities of color since the foundation of the United States.
i need to know why people want to “occupy” when the economy is no longer hunkydory, but the American economic structure has never been favorable for people of color or dirt poor white folk. WHY ARE YOU OCCUPYING NOW?
i also can’t find myself being in any agreement with a phenomenon that includes police (people are also overjoyed by the police being apart of the “99%” and them showing support for the Occupy phenomenon). i’ve never had any positive interactions with a police officer. i can’t forget police brutality, scandal, abuse, and harassment. i can’t get down with the 99%. but i can’t ignore this Occupy phenomenon either. i guess i’ll just have to keep talkin to folks and keep being critical, skeptical, and cynical about all of this.
i’ll upload videos soon. like tomorrow maybe. but in the meantime can someone provide me with some thoughtful explanations? please?
let me add this, i went by last night and you had circles of white kids playing drums while people who are  homeless were trying to sleep!! what the hell? you got people trying to sleep and you wanna have musical circles, playing flutes and shit.  hot mess! 

 The whole drum circle thing is also appropriation. And appropriation in groups where PoC don’t even feel welcome - by the same white brats who call us “primitive” when we celebrate our traditions with drums etc.

notyourkinddear:

itsyourhomegirl:

being the “99%” in my gap hoodie. loljknot.

i saw a homeless woman walking around with no shoes in Center City. i changed my shoes 3x today. but clearly we’re the same class, cause we’re both the “99%.” or at least that’s what i’ve been told…or what people want me to say and believe.

let’s be real here; the whole 99/1 index is used as a marketing technique to be all inclusive and single out the “enemy,” the “corporations.”

what about the people that have multimillion dollar homes, multiple vacation homes, multiple vehicles, multiple degrees, multiple assets, but still don’t control corporations?  in other words: what about the petite bourgeois ? are they not the “enemy” as well? do they not support, enable, and encourage an unfair American capitalistic society that so many people suddenly want to address?

furthermore, the cries (for lack of a better word at 2 am) of the “99%” are NOT, i repeat, are NOT, any different (or more serious)  than issues that have been plaguing communities of color since the foundation of the United States.

i need to know why people want to “occupy” when the economy is no longer hunkydory, but the American economic structure has never been favorable for people of color or dirt poor white folk. WHY ARE YOU OCCUPYING NOW?

i also can’t find myself being in any agreement with a phenomenon that includes police (people are also overjoyed by the police being apart of the “99%” and them showing support for the Occupy phenomenon). i’ve never had any positive interactions with a police officer. i can’t forget police brutality, scandal, abuse, and harassment. i can’t get down with the 99%. but i can’t ignore this Occupy phenomenon either. i guess i’ll just have to keep talkin to folks and keep being critical, skeptical, and cynical about all of this.

i’ll upload videos soon. like tomorrow maybe. but in the meantime can someone provide me with some thoughtful explanations? please?

let me add this, i went by last night and you had circles of white kids playing drums while people who are  homeless were trying to sleep!! what the hell? you got people trying to sleep and you wanna have musical circles, playing flutes and shit.  hot mess! 

 The whole drum circle thing is also appropriation. And appropriation in groups where PoC don’t even feel welcome - by the same white brats who call us “primitive” when we celebrate our traditions with drums etc.


I don’t think anyone (and I don’t know if you’ve had specific instances to the contrary, so take this as me speaking more in general) has said white people can’t be poor or live in poverty. I think what people have been arguing about (specifically re: OWS) is that the US only treats poverty like a serious social issue when white folks get up in arms about it, or when it begins to *severely* impact white Americans. For the most part POC and immigrant communities have been living in deep poverty for as long as they can remember and at a much higher frequency than their white counterparts. There’s also the fact that, in general, there is more sympathy for white poverty than for POC poverty. Another element to the lack of sympathy you may be seeing from POC is that collectively, and even in poverty, white America holds more wealth than *any* POC community. I’m sorry if anyone has said to you, specifically that you can’t be poor because you’re white, but I think there’s a much larger issue at hand. That issue is that POC folks have been talking about how badly the recession has hit them for a very long time. And only recently, when numbers spiked for white households has it been taken seriously. Again, I don’t know if people have said things to you about not being poor because you’re white. I think on an individual level that’s incredibly shitty. But on a systemic level, I think there is a lot of rage at being ignored for so long and suddenly having white-centric movements be taken seriously.

makeitthroughthis

Thank you dear for shedding light on this situation. It does make perfect sense, and it is an extreme injustice of this country that things like this will only be taken seriously when they start affecting white people. And it’s not that I’m asking for the sympathy of the POC community, it’s just that I don’t understand why it’s helpful to anyone to continue dividing ourselves over this issue. I’m not asking a POC to look at me and say “awww you poor baby!” I’m asking if it’s okay for ME to go up to a POC and say “we’re gonna fight this together,” because even if we’re fighting for completely different reasons, the forces we’re fighting against are becoming more and more similar.

Maybe? Yes? No? I don’t know.

(via whamola)

Well, and that’s a case-by-case basis. I know a lot of POC working groups around various issues do not want white folks involved, or rather, they don’t want white folks to involve themselves. I think if you are invited to be involved then take up that opportunity, but remember that your voice will always be secondary to theirs.

Generally, I would say it’s not appropriate to ask to be involved. Because even though there are overlapping issues they have never had the same results.

A good example is police surveillance. Many low-income communities, regardless of color suffer heavy police surveillance. But the level of action taken is wildly different between a primarily POC low-income community and a primarily white low-income community. Likewise, in the grander scale of cultural injustices, though there are many surface level similarities, the toll they take and the way they exist on the deeper level are very different.

I think there is power in POC folks (and other marginalized folks) pulling away and organizing amongst themselves. If POC folks want to work with white folks it is up to them to define the terms of that participation. 

In general we, POC, don’t get to claim spaces that are safe for us. For various reasons, including ostensibly well intentioned reasons, our spaces are often subject to intervention by non-POC persons. There’s a certain sense of entitlement (even if it’s subconscious) that allows non-POC folks to interject themselves into our spaces, conversations, and actions in a way that POC folks are never allowed to do to white spaces. i.e. the whole thing of “If you want to be involved in OWS, make your own working group and join!” Well, sure, that’s well and good, but why weren’t we part of the conversation in the first place?

So, I don’t think anyone means harm, rather, we’re trying to protect ourselves from harm.

(via note-a-bear)


liquornspice:

readnfight:

So since the white unemployment crisis is one of the reasons behind Occupy Wall Street, here’s some stats on who’s been having a crisis all along.

Unemployment rates, as of January 2011: (source)

  • All workers, 16yrs old & up: 9.0%
    • Teenagers: 25.7%

amerikkkanstories:

Blackamazon is too much: this is me being grumpy about the middle class

midwestmountainmama:

isabelthespy:

and not saying anything that hasn’t already been said, but: yes, i too grow somewhat weary (…or rather start out somewhat wary) of people whose…


rant. possible unfollow bait. whatever.
I understand the need for occupy wall street (even if it is the brainchild of fucking adbusters). Yet every time I read an article or see another white person holding a piece of paper bemoaning the cost of education or the cost of living and breathing in America I can’t help but think now you see how the other 30+% of us live. Sorry no one prepared your privileged ass for reality. Unemployment crisis? What about the fucking life crisis that’s been happening in your own backyard?

Shana Elmsford:

  (via novamatic)

Omfg, YES! There’s this new blog that’s popped up and it’s filled with pictures of mostly white people holding up signs describe their personal and financial sufferings due to the economic and “unemployment crisis”. When I first came across the site, my immediate first thought was that unemployment is suddenly this gigantic problem because white college grads can’t get the jobs they expected to get and other more qualified people now know what it’s like to live in the face if unemployment & poverty - something people of colour have been dealing in their communities for decades.

(via comingonstrong)

VALID.


lesbiancrimesquad:

socialquarantine:

these people:

but have no problem netting, macing, arresting, and physically harming peaceful protesters on Wall Street for no reason

is fucking disgusting, and if you’re not ashamed to have to call yourself American yet, you’re not paying attention.

THIS.


cognitivedissonance:


NYPD Uses Law From 1845 To Arrest Masked Protestors In Financial District
As the protests against corporate greed and the “occupation” of the Financial District continues for a third day, at least seven demonstrators have been arrested. According to Bloomberg News, two were arrested for trying to enter a Bank of America building, another for jumping a police barrier, and four more for “wearing masks in violation of a law that bars two or more participants from doing so.” This law dates back to 1845 in the Anti-Rent era—a time when a wealthy few owned feudal-esque leases to maintain control of tenants. Absolutely nothinglike today!
According to a Time’s Up! volunteer, one of the four arrested on mask charges was actually nabbed for “writing with chalk on the sidewalk,” and we’re told a police captain actually “leaped forward” over the barricade to arrest that demonstrator, who explains that he was arrested because he “placed his hand” on a barricade and didn’t have time to move away after a verbal warning. CityRoom confirms that their photographer did not witness the man attempting to jump the barricade. The NYPD maintains he did.
The anti-mask statute was passed as a response to the actions of rabble-rousing renters, seeking to prevent “distress sales” of their property by their landlords, dressing up as “Indians” to protect their rights and property. N.Y. Penal Law § 240.35(4) cropped back up in the news 11 years ago, when the KKK petitioned to wear masks protesting in the city. They were prohibited from doing so because of the statute, and sued. The USDC for the Southern District of New York sided with the KKK, and ruled the law unconstitutional, but not before protesters were arrested in 2002 for the same offense.
However, the 2nd Circuit Court of Appeals, which included current Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor, reversed that ruling in 2004, noting that because the KKK was already wearing a hood and robe, “the expressive force of the mask is, therefore, redundant.” The judges also noted that the “individual’s right to speech must always be balanced against the state’s interest in safety, and its right to regulate conduct that it legitimately considers potentially dangerous.”
Around 70 signs were reportedly stolen overnight by the NYPD as they maintained 24-hour surveillance of the area, which is being occupied by demonstrators in tents and sleeping bags.

I hope those arrested challenge their arrests on First Amendment grounds. This law seems to be constitutionally specious at best. If you’re arrested, attempt to document and/or remember everything. Then, call 212-679-6018 for the National Lawyer’s Guild, or 212-607-3300 for the ACLU. Write these numbers on your arm in sharpie.
I stand in solidarity with those occupying Wall Street. Stay strong. Estoy en solidaridad con las personas que ocupan Wall Street. Por favor mantenga fuerte en la actualidad.

cognitivedissonance:

NYPD Uses Law From 1845 To Arrest Masked Protestors In Financial District

As the protests against corporate greed and the “occupation” of the Financial District continues for a third day, at least seven demonstrators have been arrested. According to Bloomberg News, two were arrested for trying to enter a Bank of America building, another for jumping a police barrier, and four more for “wearing masks in violation of a law that bars two or more participants from doing so.” This law dates back to 1845 in the Anti-Rent era—a time when a wealthy few owned feudal-esque leases to maintain control of tenants. Absolutely nothinglike today!

According to a Time’s Up! volunteer, one of the four arrested on mask charges was actually nabbed for “writing with chalk on the sidewalk,” and we’re told a police captain actually “leaped forward” over the barricade to arrest that demonstrator, who explains that he was arrested because he “placed his hand” on a barricade and didn’t have time to move away after a verbal warning. CityRoom confirms that their photographer did not witness the man attempting to jump the barricade. The NYPD maintains he did.

The anti-mask statute was passed as a response to the actions of rabble-rousing renters, seeking to prevent “distress sales” of their property by their landlords, dressing up as “Indians” to protect their rights and property. N.Y. Penal Law § 240.35(4) cropped back up in the news 11 years ago, when the KKK petitioned to wear masks protesting in the city. They were prohibited from doing so because of the statute, and sued. The USDC for the Southern District of New York sided with the KKK, and ruled the law unconstitutional, but not before protesters were arrested in 2002 for the same offense.

However, the 2nd Circuit Court of Appeals, which included current Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor, reversed that ruling in 2004, noting that because the KKK was already wearing a hood and robe, “the expressive force of the mask is, therefore, redundant.” The judges also noted that the “individual’s right to speech must always be balanced against the state’s interest in safety, and its right to regulate conduct that it legitimately considers potentially dangerous.”

Around 70 signs were reportedly stolen overnight by the NYPD as they maintained 24-hour surveillance of the area, which is being occupied by demonstrators in tents and sleeping bags.

I hope those arrested challenge their arrests on First Amendment grounds. This law seems to be constitutionally specious at best. If you’re arrested, attempt to document and/or remember everything. Then, call 212-679-6018 for the National Lawyer’s Guild, or 212-607-3300 for the ACLU. Write these numbers on your arm in sharpie.

I stand in solidarity with those occupying Wall Street. Stay strong.
Estoy en solidaridad con las personas que ocupan Wall Street. Por favor mantenga fuerte en la actualidad.