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Naked Sushi. Information on the author will be provided on a need to know basis.

jinn0uchi:

dendropsyche:

OKAY so i just saw the most ridiculous thing at the store today

so we come across this thing

image

and we discover you can turn it inside out and

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ITS HELLO KITTY I’Mimage

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HSE’S EVEN GOT HER OWN LITTLE CHICKEN DRUMSTICK IM SO DONE

why the fuck


revolutionary-mindset:

The grand jury that began hearing evidence Wednesday in the case of the fatal shooting of unarmed, black teen Michael Brown is primarily white, according to the St. Louis Dispatch.

There are three black people on the grand jury, one man and two women. The rest of the jury comprises six white men and three white women. The demographics of the jury roughly coincide with the racial makeup of St. Louis County itself, which is 68 percent white and 24 percent black. But race has already played a major role in this case, as it has garnered international attention and sparked conversation about racial discrimination and inequality prompting demonstrators to protest nationwide.

According to the Missouri attorney general’s office, the grand jury will decide whether a crime has been committed and “whether there is probable cause to believe the defendant committed it.” If the jury makes that decision, it can issue an indictment formally charging the defendant.

Police said Brown was shot multiple times on Aug. 9 after being confronted by a white officer. Authorities initially offered vague details about the confrontation but said the officer involved had been placed on administrative leave. The FBI opened an investigation into Brown’s death last week.

revolutionary-mindset:

The grand jury that began hearing evidence Wednesday in the case of the fatal shooting of unarmed, black teen Michael Brown is primarily white, according to the St. Louis Dispatch.

There are three black people on the grand jury, one man and two women. The rest of the jury comprises six white men and three white women. The demographics of the jury roughly coincide with the racial makeup of St. Louis County itself, which is 68 percent white and 24 percent black. But race has already played a major role in this case, as it has garnered international attention and sparked conversation about racial discrimination and inequality prompting demonstrators to protest nationwide.

According to the Missouri attorney general’s office, the grand jury will decide whether a crime has been committed and “whether there is probable cause to believe the defendant committed it.” If the jury makes that decision, it can issue an indictment formally charging the defendant.

Police said Brown was shot multiple times on Aug. 9 after being confronted by a white officer. Authorities initially offered vague details about the confrontation but said the officer involved had been placed on administrative leave. The FBI opened an investigation into Brown’s death last week.


blackfashion:

Bishops
20
Shirt - Dashiki
Ghana
bishopsx.tumblr.com

blackfashion:

Bishops

20

Shirt - Dashiki

Ghana

bishopsx.tumblr.com


freehawaii:

Honolulu Star-Advertiser - June 29, 2014

The Native Hawaiian community on Molokai added its voice to the growing chorus of those who are rejecting a federal proposal that could lead to a formal U.S. relationship with a potential Native Hawaiian government.

More than 125 people attended a hearing at Kaunakakai Elementary School and the vast majority of the more than 40 people who testified offered a resounding repudiation of federal recognition.

"It has become painfully obvious from these hearings that those Hawaiian leaders who have called you here in hopes of protecting our entitlements and federal funding have done so without consulting their people," declared veteran Molokai activist Walter Ritte. "The majority is in no mood to continue a subservient relationship with the United States."

The hearing featured raised voices, anger and tears but, for the most part, audience members and speakers were courteous in contrast to last week’s O`ahu hearings, which were punctuated by intimidating testimony, boos and jeers.

The same relatively cordial tone was seen at Friday’s hearing on Lāna`i, where about 50 people attended and a handful testified primarily against federal recognition.

With Saturday’s hearing, the Department of the Interior panel has reached the halfway point of its two-week, 15-meeting Hawai`i tour in which it is asking whether the department should launch a rule-making process that could set the framework for re-establishing a government-to-government relationship with Native Hawaiians.

Eight more hearings remain in Hawai`i, starting Monday night on Kaua`i. Additional meetings will be held in Native American communities on the mainland, and the department will take written comments well into August….

…But many of those who did come to the hearing took the opportunity to vent, often angrily, about the 1893 overthrow of Queen Lili`uokalani, about stolen lands and injustices. Many said they didn’t want to settle for being an Indian tribe, and others said they were standing up on behalf of the deposed Hawaiian kingdom.

"I’m not an American," Hanohano Naehu declared repeatedly. He then turned to the panel and said: "Shame on you guys for perpetuating the illegality. Shame on you for perpetuating the fraud."

Kanoe Davis of Kaunakakai said Native Hawaiians need “clarity and truth” about the federal-recognition issue.

"How do we establish government-to-government when we are in fact supposed to be our own nation?" she said. "We’re settling for crumbs when we actually own the cookie."

Many who testified described the process as rushed and pushed forward without allowing those affected to examine the issues and formulate opinions.

Lynn DeCoite, a third-generation Hawaiian homesteader, blasted the department for not doing enough to inform and educate the community.

"In my opinion, you have put the cart before the horse," DeCoite said. "We should know the benefits beforehand and not create the government to find out the benefits later. It’s as if you, this department, has put a choke chain around our Hawaiian people. You guys keep us at arm’s length and try to use us as puppets."

Sam Kealoha, a third-generation Army veteran, raised his voice in frustration: “The river of justice may be flowing (for tribes on the mainland) but the river from mauka to makai — the free flow of justice, there is no water.

"You guys are getting beat up on every island," George Aiwohi told the panel. "But — you know what? — this is our chance to speak. We waited 121 years for this…."


pardonmybloomers:


 ♪come and get your love♪


GET ON MY BODY

pardonmybloomers:

 ♪come and get your love

GET ON MY BODY


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